Thursday, March 19, 2020

Discussion #4 Ethics Example

Discussion #4 Ethics Example Discussion #4 Ethics – Essay Example American Capitalism: Wage Discrepancy between CEOs and Other Workers Compensation of CEOs and other workers should be based on the contribution of the employee to the organization. It follows that pay differences should reflect each person’s effort towards the success of the firm. Executive members are responsible for major decisions and thus have more liability in case of business failure. As a result, their package should reflect the risk they take and obligations towards the continuity of the organization. However, this does not imply that the CEOs increase their salaries indiscriminately without consideration of the widening wage gaps as it poses a social-economic risk to the country. Firms downsize the workforce due to reasons such as financial stress or restructuring. In financial distress, it is unfair to increase a CEO’s salary while firing workers. It is ethical for CEOs to also accept a pay cut to save the jobs of fellow workers. However, if the downsizing is a result of restructuring, then the pay increase of CEOs cannot be morally unjust. The revisions on compensation of CEOs should follow well-structured system that involves a non-partisan board. The board should consider all relevant issues affecting compensation like growth in the revenues of the firm as a result of CEO’s actions, risk adjustments, economic considerations and also wage gap issues. Compensation for the CEOs and other workers can be adjusted without subjecting workers to pay cuts and layoffs as a result of pay increase of the executive. The government can regulate the ratio of the CEO salary to that of the average workers. By doing this, the workers can also benefit from an increase in the salary of the CEOs.

Monday, March 2, 2020

March to the Sea - Civil War

March to the Sea - Civil War Conflict Dates: Shermans March to the Sea took place from November 15 to December 22, 1864, during the American Civil War. Armies Commanders: Union Major General William T. Sherman62,000 men Confederates Lieutenant General William J. Hardee13,000 men Background: In the wake of his successful campaign to capture Atlanta, Major General William T. Sherman began making plans for a march against Savannah. Consulting with Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, the two men agreed that it would be necessary to destroy the Souths economic and psychological will to resist if the war was to be won. To accomplish this, Sherman intended to conduct a campaign designed to eliminate any resources that could be used by Confederate forces. Consulting the crop and livestock data from the 1860 census, he planned a route that would inflict maximum damage upon the enemy. In addition to the economic damage, it was thought that Shermans movement would increase pressure on General Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia and allow Grant to gain a victory in the Siege of Petersburg. Presenting his plan to Grant, Sherman received approval and began making preparations to depart Atlanta on November 15, 1864. During the march, Shermans forces would cut loose from their supply lines and would live off the land. To ensure that adequate supplies were gathered, Sherman issued strict orders regarding foraging and the seizure of material from the local population. Known as bummers, foragers from the army became a common sight along its route of march. Dividing his forces in three, Sherman advanced along two major routes with Major General Oliver O. Howards Army of the Tennessee on the right and Major General Henry Slocums Army of Georgia on the left. The Armies of the Cumberland and Ohio were detached under the command of Major General George H. Thomas with orders to guard Shermans rear from the remnants of General John Bell Hoods Army of Tennessee. As Sherman advanced to the sea, Thomas men destroyed Hoods army at the Battles of Franklin and Nashville. To oppose Shermans 62,000 men, Lieutenant General William J. Hardee, commanding the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida struggled to find men as Hood had largely stripped the region for his army. Through the course of the campaign, Hardee was able to utilize those troops still in Georgia as well as those brought in from Florida and the Carolinas. Despite these reinforcements, he seldom possessed more than 13,000 men. Sherman Departs: Departing Atlanta by different routes, the Howard and Slocums columns attempted to confuse Hardee as to their ultimate objective with Macon, Augusta, or Savannah as possible destinations. Initially moving south, Howards men pushed Confederate troops out of Lovejoys Station before pressing on towards Macon. To the north, Slocums two corps moved east then southeast towards the state capital at Milledgeville. Finally realizing that Savannah was Shermans target, Hardee began concentrating his men to defend the city, while ordering Major General Joseph Wheelers cavalry to attack the Union flanks and rear. Laying Waste to Georgia: As Shermans men pushed southeast, they systematically destroyed all manufacturing plants, agricultural infrastructure, and railroads they encountered. A common technique for wrecking the latter was heating railroad rails over fires and twisting them around trees. Known as Shermans Neckties, they became a common sight along the route of march. The first significant action of the march occurred at Griswoldville on November 22, when Wheelers cavalry and Georgia militia attacked on Howards front. The initial assault was halted by Brigadier General Hugh Judson Kilpatricks cavalry which in turn counterattacked. In the fighting that followed, Union infantry inflicted a severe defeat on the Confederates. During the remainder of November and in early December, numerous minor battles were fought, such as Buck Head Creek and Waynesboro, as Shermans men pushed relentlessly on towards Savannah. At the former, Kilpatrick was surprised and nearly captured. Falling back, he was reinforced and was able to halt Wheelers advance. As they approached Savannah, additional Union troops entered the fray as 5,500 men, under Brigadier General John P. Hatch, descended from Hilton Head, SC in an attempt to cut the Charleston Savannah Railroad near Pocotaligo. Encountering Confederate troops led by General G.W. Smith on November 30, Hatch moved to attack. In the resulting Battle of Honey Hill, Hatchs men were forced to withdraw after several assaults against the Confederate entrenchments failed. A Christmas Present for Pres. Lincoln: Arriving outside Savannah on December 10, Sherman found that Hardee had flooded the fields outside the city which limited access to a few causeways. Entrenched in a strong position, Hardee refused to surrender and remained determined to defend the city. Needing to link up with the US Navy to receive supplies, Sherman dispatched Brigadier General William Hazens division to capture Fort McAllister on the Ogeechee River. This was accomplished on December 13, and communications were opened with Rear Admiral John Dahlgrens naval forces. With his supply lines reopened, Sherman began making plans to lay siege to Savannah. On December 17, he contacted Hardee with a warning that he would begin shelling the city if it were not surrendered. Unwilling to give in, Hardee escaped with his command over the Savannah River on December 20 using an improvised pontoon bridge. The following morning, the mayor of Savannah formally surrendered the city to Sherman. Aftermath: Known as Shermans March to the Sea, the campaign through Georgia effectively eliminated the regions economic usefulness to the Confederate cause. With the city secured, Sherman telegraphed President Abraham Lincoln with the message, I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the City of Savannah, with one hundred and fifty guns and plenty of ammunition, also about twenty-five thousand bales of cotton. The following spring, Sherman launched his final campaign of the war north into the Carolinas, before finally receiving the surrender of General Joseph Johnston on April 26, 1865. Selected Sources History Channel: Shermans MarchSon of the South: Shermans MarchCivil War Home: Shermans March to the Sea

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Effects of employment insurance on unemployment (Canada) Essay

Effects of employment insurance on unemployment (Canada) - Essay Example policy is to increase the opportunity cost of those Canadian citizens’ who are unemployed and to reduce the cost of working by mobilizing the unemployed people to look for a job.1 It is believed that this policy will help unload the burden on low-skilled laborers as well as improving the Canadian public employment agencies. In the short term run, it is expected that there will be an increase in the unemployment rate because the employment insurance policy is expected to promote more people into job searching. The number of people looking for jobs will continue to increase because of the job searching performance that is being monitored directly by the Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC). The increase in the supply of manpower will create an adjustment in the supply and demand curve of labor in the market. (See figure 1) The increase in the number of people looking for a job will eventually affect the supply and demand for employment in the sense that the bigger the supply of manpower available in the market force will give room for employers to select a prospective employee at a lower salary. (See figure 2) Considering that the supply of manpower continuously increases, the demand for manpower decreases. This will give the company the privilege to select competent employees at a cheaper salary. Cheaper salary will result to a decrease in the operational cost per unit in production. A lower operational cost will result to an added profit for the company. (See figure 3) For example, a company is able to manufacture a toy that sells for $10 per hour. Given that there is no other production cost except for the salary of a worker, if the salary of a new worker is only $5 per hour as compared an old employee rate of $7 per hour, the profit per unit will be: Profit per toy (new worker) = Price – Cost per toy The same process applies in reverse. Given that the selling prices fall but the input costs are relatively fixed, the profit margin will

Sunday, February 2, 2020

The Integration of Culture in Organizational Innovation Context Research Paper

The Integration of Culture in Organizational Innovation Context - Research Paper Example Schein (2010) found it difficult to derive a definition of culture due to conceptual and semantic confusions while the scholar also argued that it is not possible to define different social groups under the roof of universally accepted definition of culture. In such context, Alvesson and Sveningsson (2008) suggested that the focus should be on defining culture within organization rather than understanding the culture of social groups sharing similar kind of traditions, rituals, history and customs. Brooks (2009) also tried to define the organizational culture in terms of norms, behavior of members and knowledge sharing, yet, such definition is far from capturing full dimensions of culture. To clear out confusions regarding definition and characteristics of organizational culture, the research paper will use Schein’s (2010) idea for organizational culture. According to Schein (2010), organizational culture has dimensions like behavioral regularities, group dynamics, espoused va lues, ideological principles, unwritten rules of the organization, communication between members, special competencies displayed by group members, shared cognitive frames between members, the way team members celebrate within organization, emotional and aesthetic response etc. Now, the fact is that it is very difficult to integrate all the mentioned elements within same organizational context but there is no doubt that these factors play vital role in shaping the organizational culture. Schein (2010) also identified three levels of culture such as, Artifacts, Espoused Beliefs & Value and Underlying Assumptions. Artifacts- structure of the organization and business process can help the firm to define its culture. For example, W.L. Gore & Associates which is known for its lattice organizational structure and business process fostering innovation and creativity (Gore, 2013). Espoused Beliefs & Value- strategies of the organization and vision statement can be termed as the brickwork beh ind culture.  Ã‚  

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Character Analysis of The Wife of Bath of Chaucers Canterbury Tales :: Chaucer The Wife of Bath

Character Analysis of The Wife of Bath of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Chaucer opens with a description of twenty-nine people who are going on a pilgrimage. Each person has a distinct personality that we can recognize from the way people behave today. He purposely makes The Wife of Bath stand out more compared to the other characters. In Chaucer’s â€Å"General Prologue,† the Wife of Bath is intentionally described in an explicit way to provoke a shocking response. Her clothes, physical features and references to her past are purposely discussed by Chaucer causing the reader to wonder how well she fits the rules imposed by Christian authorities regarding womanly behavior. Women were categorized as saints or sinners by their actions according to Christian tradition. There were two women who represented the sinner or the saint. Eve caused the downfall of all men â€Å" supposedly† whereas the Virgin Mary, the mother of Christ, symbolized purity. The Wife of Bath is a headst rong bold woman of her time. She shows off her Sunday clothes with evident pride, wearing ten pounds of cloth, woven by herself under her hat.Her clothing symbolizes to the reader that she is not timid or shy and also shows off her expertise as a weaver.. Chaucer discusses his words to describe the Wife quite distinctly. His descriptions of her facial and bodily features are sexually suggestive. The features that Chaucer pays attention to describing Alison should be noticed. In the â€Å"General Prologue,† Chaucer's description involves her physical appearance describing her clothes, legs, feet, hips, and most importantly her gap-tooth, which during that time (according to The Wife), symbolized sensuality and lust. He discusses how she is a talented weaver and devoted Christian who goes on pilgrimages often. This may make the reader believe that she is a religious woman, but the reader later sees that the Wife's reason to go on these pilgrimages is not due to religion. She feels that every place should be seen; this has nothing to due with religion. She may also be dedicated traveller, a medieval tourist who likes to sight see. She is a very self-confident woman who thinks highly of herself and her skills as a cloth maker. The ironic part is when Chaucer adds that she has a gap between her teeth. During the fourteenth century, having a gap between the teeth was symbolic of a sensual nature. Character Analysis of The Wife of Bath of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales :: Chaucer The Wife of Bath Character Analysis of The Wife of Bath of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Chaucer opens with a description of twenty-nine people who are going on a pilgrimage. Each person has a distinct personality that we can recognize from the way people behave today. He purposely makes The Wife of Bath stand out more compared to the other characters. In Chaucer’s â€Å"General Prologue,† the Wife of Bath is intentionally described in an explicit way to provoke a shocking response. Her clothes, physical features and references to her past are purposely discussed by Chaucer causing the reader to wonder how well she fits the rules imposed by Christian authorities regarding womanly behavior. Women were categorized as saints or sinners by their actions according to Christian tradition. There were two women who represented the sinner or the saint. Eve caused the downfall of all men â€Å" supposedly† whereas the Virgin Mary, the mother of Christ, symbolized purity. The Wife of Bath is a headst rong bold woman of her time. She shows off her Sunday clothes with evident pride, wearing ten pounds of cloth, woven by herself under her hat.Her clothing symbolizes to the reader that she is not timid or shy and also shows off her expertise as a weaver.. Chaucer discusses his words to describe the Wife quite distinctly. His descriptions of her facial and bodily features are sexually suggestive. The features that Chaucer pays attention to describing Alison should be noticed. In the â€Å"General Prologue,† Chaucer's description involves her physical appearance describing her clothes, legs, feet, hips, and most importantly her gap-tooth, which during that time (according to The Wife), symbolized sensuality and lust. He discusses how she is a talented weaver and devoted Christian who goes on pilgrimages often. This may make the reader believe that she is a religious woman, but the reader later sees that the Wife's reason to go on these pilgrimages is not due to religion. She feels that every place should be seen; this has nothing to due with religion. She may also be dedicated traveller, a medieval tourist who likes to sight see. She is a very self-confident woman who thinks highly of herself and her skills as a cloth maker. The ironic part is when Chaucer adds that she has a gap between her teeth. During the fourteenth century, having a gap between the teeth was symbolic of a sensual nature.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Relevant and Non-Relevant Costs

South Carolina Electric and Gas (SCE&G), a principal subsidiary of SCANA Corporation, makes life convenient by bringing electricity and natural gas to homes and businesses. The company also provides residential, commercial, and industrial builder service firms the energy they need for construction (www.sceg.com). The company also has telecommunications services and other businesses which involve non-regulated energy. To supply electricity and natural gas, SCE&G operates 22 various plants, most of which are coal plants. Today, SCE&G serves nearly 1 million customers in South Carolina (â€Å"SCE&G Quick Facts†).The coal plants of SCE&G emit nitrogen oxide. Also known as NOx, this is one of the compounds that form smog in the atmosphere. Thus, the company has been making efforts to lower the emission of NOx. Just recently, SCE&G has installed the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) equipment on Wateree Station and Williams Station, the two largest plants of the company to reduce NOx emission. This has cost them $138 million (www.sceg.com). The company has also invested 80 million dollars on equipment for emission and pollution control (Zaleski, 2007).In 2008, the firm has decided to install the SCR equipment on the Cope Station as well. The project, which started on the summer of 2007 and will end on the fall of 2008, will cost the company 69 million dollars (Zaleski, 2007). This amount includes relevant costs (i.e., costs that are significant to a specific decision) such as the cost of the equipment and the cost of installation (CITATION).The previously mentioned expenditures prior to the Cope Station project–the investment on SCR equipment and on the emission and pollution control equipment—are considered sunk costs. Whether SCE&G would push through with the Cope project or not, the costs of these equipments have already been incurred. Hence, they are irrelevant to the project.SCE&G reported in its statement of projected expenditure that the budget for the Cope Station project was $ 26 million (â€Å"SCANA Corp. 2007-2009 Projection Expenditure,† 2007). Since the investment would cost $ 69 million, it would result in a budget deficit of $ 43 million. This implies that the company had to make budget adjustments in order to fund the said project.When the project is complete, it would surely result in â€Å"clean, safe, and reliable power source for [the] citizens and industries† (Zaleski, 2007). Although it would not bring the company explicit financial benefits, by making the plant environment-friendly, the project can further contribute to the healthy relationship of SCE&G with its neighboring communities. Moreover, this may â€Å"attract new industries [to invest] in [the] area† as the environment becomes free of the polluting NOx (Zaleski, 2007).ReferenceAbout SE&G.. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2008 from http://www.sceg.com/en/about-sceg/Builder services. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2008 from http://www.sceg.com/en/builder servicesNitrogen oxides. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2008 fromhttp://www.sceg.com/en/my-community/environment/air/nitrogen-oxides/Residential services. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2008 fromhttp://www.sceg.com/en/residential-services/SCANA Corporation 2007-2009 projections for capital expenditures and cash flows. (9February 2007). Retrieved January 26, 2008 fromhttp://www.secinfo.com/dN11u.u3.c.htmSCE&G quickfacts. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2008 fromhttp://www.sceg.com/NR/rdonlyres/26ADE7BE-0699-41C8-84C7-32C488E5292A/0/SCEGQuickFacts.pdfZaleski, G.. (6 November 2007). SCE&G investing $69 million in Cope plan to reduceemissions. The Times and Democrat. Retrieved January 26, 2008 fromhttp://www.thetandd.com/articles/2007/11/06/news/12812156.txt

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

The Effects Of Poaching And How It Affects Endangered Animals

Kevin Hoff Outline Topic: Poaching endangered species General Purpose: To persuade the audience the impact of poaching and how it affects endangered animals. Specific Goal/ Purpose: To highlight the impact poaching has to species. Central Idea or Thesis Statement: The impact big game hunting has on species especially those whom are endangered and there’s a difference between legal and illegal hunting. Introduction I. How many species do you think go extinct daily? This is including plants, birds, mammals and insects. A. Well the answer is at a disturbing high 150-200 species a day. 1. That’s and average of 73,000 species a year. B. That we†¦show more content†¦a.) Elephants tusks can sell up to $2,100 per every 2.2 pounds it weighs. 1. â€Å"100,000 African elephants were poached across the continent between 2010 and 2012. According to those figures, in 2011 alone poachers killed roughly one in every 12 African elephants.†( USAToday.com, Jessica Phelan, 2015) a.) Rhinos horns can sell up to $65,000 per every 2.2 pounds it weighs. 1. Making rhino horns more expensive pound for pound than gold and diamonds 2. Roughly 400 illegal killings of rhinos last year. c.) Tigers are killed for their skin, teeth, claws, tail and even their whiskers. d.) Sea turtles are killed for bait for sharks and for certain part of their skin and shells to create leather and or perfumes. e.) Lemurs are on the brink of extinction and illegal to kill but are still hunted and sold to restaurants. f.) Gorillas are killed for their meat to serve at restaurants usually to wealthy clients. Also their heads, feet and hands are sometimes kept for trophies. B. Whether its legal or not poachers are at an all-time high. Transition: Shooting fish in a barrel. II. Breeding for the kill. A. Canned hunting is becoming increasingly popular 1. Canned hunting is still trophy hunting but the animals are kept in a confined area making it easier for a hunter to get the kill. B. Lions most famous for canned hunting. 1. Over 160 farms in Africa breed captive lions and sell them to game hunters to huntShow MoreRelatedPoaching in Africa1243 Words   |  5 Pages Endangered animals all over Africa are on the verge of extinction due to human greed. It is very difficult to even fathom how many animals are lost each year to poaching. Animals are being stripped for their parts and left for dead. Poaching has completely exhausted animal populations in Africa, which damages the environment, and is affecting people all over the world both socially and through international relations. Poaching is a growing activity in Africa and it is dangerously depleting animalRead MoreShould We Save Endangered Species?1740 Words   |  7 PagesShould more be done to protect and preserve endangered animals? The reasons for saving endangered species might seem obvious to many people, but many question why we should save a species from dying out. Isn t this part of the process of natural selection? Is there any environmental benefit to preserving a dying species? For some it s a question with an obvious answer, for others... it requires some thought. What benefit is there to saving an endangered species from dying out? This article outlinesRead MoreThe Human Of Endangered Species1309 Words   |  6 Pagescycle of life, there are major effects that occur and bring negative problems. Humans are most likely the ones to blame for endangering these species. But global warming has helped play a part in it as well. Even though the answers to solving the problem on saving endangered species are known and well aware of, not enough of the human has reached out to lend a hand. The greed of mankind is taking away plants and animals habitats. It is affecting the food chain for animals and is killing off many plantsRead MorePoachers Kill Magnificent Animals for Profit Essay624 Words   |  3 Pages oh my!† Some know animals such as these to be scary; other people understand these animals to be a beautiful creation of Earth. Whether you are afraid of mighty beasts or simply in awe of them, it astonishes many people when they realize how few of them are still alive. Rhinoceroses, elephants, leopards, tigers, African lions, and many more creatures are all considered an endangered species, and we are the reason they are deemed that way. The one element all of those animals have in common is thatRead MoreShould Animal Poaching Be Illegal?1914 Words   |  8 PagesShould Animal Poaching be Illegal? Paris Garner Dr. Williams 15 May 2016 ELA 12/3 TABLE OF CONTENTS†¨ Abstract†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦pg. 3 Introduction.†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦. pg. 4 History†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦..pg. 4 Problem Statement†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦....pg. 5 Methodology†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.pg. 6 Data†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦...pg. 6 Summary Findings†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦....pg. 8 Resolution†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.pg. 9 Conclusion†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Read MoreHuman Involvement And Human Intervention1225 Words   |  5 Pagesor a particular disease wipes out an area, calling for humans to get involved. Also, humans sometimes lead to the extinction of species, through poaching or the killing of a certain species. This may also occur when individuals cut down trees and destroy ecosystems. However, occasionally, human involvement can greatly benefit a certain species of animal or plant. Human intervention can lead to the growth of a certain species and allow them to thrive and reproduce in their ecosystem, causing the growthRead MoreAnnotated Bibliography On Animal Poaching3376 Words   |  14 PagesProfessor Andrew Franz Esq. CJL 4115 April 15, 2015 Elephant Poaching When one imagines what elephants are like in the wild, they imagine giant animals roaming the land eating plenty of food and drinking plenty of water. The average person may not know, or understand, that there are people that practice the illegal killing of elephants, or poaching, in order to obtain and then sell or trade that ivory for whatever is valuable to the poacher. Poaching is illegal because it has led to the significant declineRead MoreEndangered Animals Are Endangered Species1411 Words   |  6 PagesNot many people know about endangered animals or what makes them endangered. Animals have been endangered and going extinct for over 635 million years. Although extinction is a natural phenomenon, it occurs at a natural â€Å"background† rate of about one to five species per year. Scientists estimate that we’re now losing species at 1,000 to 10,000 times the background rate, with dozens going extinct every day. As many as 30 to 50 percent of all species could p ossibly be heading toward extinction by mid-centuryRead MoreThe King of the Savannah is Becoming Extinct951 Words   |  4 Pagessuch a big deal to some people here in the United States of America, but it affects every one in Africa (and Asia) as a whole. These big animals are becoming extinct mostly because of human involvement. If these animals were to become extinct it can cause a giant boom in the herbivore population which can cause a drop in vegetation that is available for humans and the animals that are in need. It is a chain reaction that effects everyone that is involved. Where as, African Lions are at the head of theRead MoreThe Endangered Species Act, Or Esa For Short1921 Words   |  8 PagesThe Endangered Species Act, or ESA for short, became a law in 1973 and is enforced by the U.S. to protect species from extinction, mainly due to development for economic growth.The ESA is one of the most popular and effective environmental laws ever enacted. It is a commitment by humans to work together to protect and restore those species that are most at risk of extinction. Unfortunately, the natural systems we depend on are at risk, and plants and animals worldwide are disappearing. In the United